Monthly Archives: August 2009

A new winery in Plain City, Eldchrist Winery, features not only wines made on the premises, but also two kitties who serve as the business’ feline mascots.

“B” and Mittens, two white kittens, who spend most of their time playing on the newly renovated patio or hanging out with the winery owners’ children, give the winery a charm that adds to the feeling of home at the 1863 farmhouse on State Route 736.  B, who was originally named Bianca until it was discovered she was a he and Mittens, a polydactyl, Hemingway kitty with extra front toes, were strays who actually got their vaccines and neuter surgeries through B and O. 

The winery just recently opened for tastings on Fridays from 6-9 pm and Saturdays from 3-8 pm.  B and Mittens are always hanging out, ready and willing to meet anyone who will give them a rub on the head. 

We think it is so nice when business owners are able to incorporate animals into their businesses and give a homeless kitty a new place to live.  So the next time you are in Plain City, stop by the winery at 8189 State Route 736 and meet B and Mittens, too.  To get more info on Eldchrist Winery, visit www.eldchrist.com

B and Mittens might also someday get the distinction of being featured on a wine label for the winery!!  They will be very famous kitties indeed when that happens.  What a turn around for them–from homeless to celebrities!!

 

B and Mittens hang out with Reed.

B and Mittens hang out with Reed.

 

Dr. O'Keefe holds HBC

Dr. O'Keefe holds HBC

 

 

I stopped in to Riverside Drive Animal Care Center yesterday and Dr. O’Keefe happened to be around. When she saw me, she asked if B and O could help with a special needs kitty that she had nicknamed, HBC.  HBC originally stood for “Hit BY Car.”  A nice couple found the tiger tabby cat by the side of a busy road, stumbling around and acting traumatized. They thought he had been “Hit by a car.” So like any good samaritans, they rushed the cat to Riverside. After an initial investigative check up, Dr. O’Keefe decided that HBC had not been hit, but instead had a neurological condition due to having a type of larvae in his brain.  

Poor HBC, who is now Humphrey Bob Christenson, had vision and stability problems. He had problems walking and would stumble and fall.  With treatment for the larvae, Dr. O’Keefe has noticed significant changes in his movement and his vision.  She now thinks his sight has returned in one eye.  Dr. O’Keefe feels that with continued treatment, HBC will improve even more.  While he might not ever be completely normal, she feels he has a good chance of regaining much of what was lost due to the larvae.

Now here is the problem.  Dr. O’Keefe can’t keep HBC at Riverside forever.  She needs to find a quiet place for him to recover and has graciously offered to donate her services to give HBC vaccines and other medical care if someone will foster him or adopt him.

HBC is very docile and loving.  He wants nothing more than to be held and carried around sort of like a big stuffed toy.  When Dr. O’Keefe was holding him he just hung from her arms in a very contented manner.  He reminded me of the comic strip, “Calvin and Hobbes.”  Maybe the “H” could stand for “Hobbes” who was the stuffed tiger toy in the cartoon strip, who through Calvin’s love magically came to life.  HBC just needs love to return him to life, as well.

If you are interested in fostering or adopting HBC, please either contact us or Riverside at 614-766-1222.  Dr. O’Keefe has fallen in love with this big guy and wants to give him a chance after all he has been through.

 

 

HBC or "hit by car"

HBC or "hit by car"

Subscribe by Email